Holiday Gift Guide for The Analog Photographer

Holiday Gift Guide for The Analog Photographer

 

I thought that this year I should put together a small collection of gifts that an analog photographer may want. They range from all sorts of the analog spectra from bags and albums all the way to film. I know I would love to find these under the tree.

 

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MAGENTA 600 MONOCHROME FILM REVIEW

Magenta Impossible Project Film

Before I moved to California and traveled a bit I managed to  purchase some new experimental film from The Impossible Project. It was a completely pink film, or as they called it a monochromatic magenta. It was very similar to their Cyanograph Film, which was completely blue. I bought 2 packs and I brought them along with me to my trip to Ireland and Spain. The film was made for 600 series cameras, but I used it with my SX-70 folding SLR camera with a Neutral Density filter. The photo above is of Slane Castle in County Meath, Ireland. Many great concerts have been performed on the grounds including U2 and Red Hot Chili Peppers.

Camp Nou Impossible Project Film

The above photo was taken in Barcelona Spain in Camp Nou. It was a pretty hot and sunny day, and I was surprised that the photo came out as well as it did without it being completely washed out. You can just make out the stadium seats spelling out MES QUE UN CLUB.

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CYANOGRAPH SX-70 Film Review

Cyanograph Film ReviewA few weeks ago I posted that The Impossible Project came out with some experimental film called Cyanograph. It was a monochromatic all blue film and was made for use with SX-70 model cameras. It was relatively cheaper then their normally priced film so I managed to buy a few packs of it.

Below are some of the results of the film using several different cameras, though I believe the best came from a folding SX-70 SLR.  The first few are from non-folding box SX-70 cameras and were mostly taken outside in sunlight.

Cyanograph Film SX-70 Impossible ProjectThis first photo was taken with a non-folding SX-70 camera with an electronic flash. I think that the contrast between the sheets and Mark came out really well and it’s one of the best lit photos that I was able to take.

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The Impossible Project Film and the Bitter Cold

Impossible Project Film

This is a follow up to my The Impossible Project Film in the heat of summer post. Their film is very temperamental and if it’s not developed in the right conditions the colors may be a little off. The main things that affect the development process is temperature and light. I am going to give my insight into developing pictures in cold weather today.

I live in Boston, and to say the least it has been a very long, snowy and cold winter. Taking pictures in this weather is not easy considering I generally walk about town with camera and film in tow making it susceptible to the outside weather. I decided to take out two different cameras out one day during a light snow fall, but it was about 15 degrees F outside. I took with me a more modern 600 series camera with built in flash from the 90’s and a folding SLR SX-70 Sonar OneStep. Both films for the cameras were taken out of the fridge and set out to reach room temperature for about an hour. So after the hour I load the film into the camera and I am out the door.

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Experimental CYANOGRAPH Film for SX-70 Cameras

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The Impossible Project just launched some new experimental film for SX-70 cameras called Cyanograph. It is described as “experimental monochromatic, low-contrast all blue film”. The film just went on sale today, but I would expect for it to be sold out in the next few days. This was offered to Impossible Pioneers first and now it is being offered to the general public.

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The Impossible Project Wish List

The Impossible Project Wish List

 

Review – Polaroid Impulse 600 Camera

Polaroid Impulse Camera

Polaroid Impulse 600

The Impulse camera is non-folding 600 camera that is similar to the SX-70 non-folding cameras. I am not sure when these cameras were first produced, but I have a strong feeling that it was in the late 80’s. There are many versions of this camera, but they generally only varied in color and not much in functionality. This review is for the most common blue grey colored version. It comes with a built-in pop up flash that you push on to reveal the lens. You push it again and the lens cover slides back over and keeps the lens protected. When the cover is over the lens it also causes the camera to kind of shut down and you are not able to take photos. It’s shutter button is located on top towards the back of the camera. Some versions of the camera have a close-up option that is also located on the top of the camera and you have to slide a button and keep it there if you think your subject is within 2-4 feet.  The camera is made out of plastic with a vinyl sort of covering over where you would hold the camera on the sides. The light management system is located in front of the camera right below the lens. It can be moved from the left side (lighter) to the right side (darker).  This camera can sometimes be found in stock in my Etsy Shop or you can also find them on Ebay.com and in thrift shops. Since it is somewhat “newer” than a lot of other Polaroid Cameras it tends to be in good shape.

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Cape Cod Through a Polaroid Spectra 2 Camera

Taken with Spectra 2 in Cape CodA few weekends I was treated to a weekend out in Cape Cod. It was a good experience, and being about an hour or so drive from my home I still rarely ever go, and have never been during the fall. I took a Spectra 2 Polaroid camera I had just received in the mail and had yet to test. I decided that I had to take it with me to see the results it would give.

 il_fullxfull.458908273_7lazJust to let you know it was not warm when I went. It was generally between 40 and 60 degrees F the entire weekend. This temperature is pretty ideal for Polaroid film and most of my images had no problem developing, although with a somewhat blue hue due to the colder temperature. I also made sure to shield the pictures from direct sunlight right when they were ejected from the camera and kept them in a book until they fully developed.

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Polaroid Graduation at Smith College

Smith College on PX70 Film

This past weekend one of my best friends finally graduated from Smith College. I personally graduated from Smith a few years ago so it was a fun experience to go back and relive graduation without it really being a reunion year.  We had good time going to Illumination Night and going to the ceremony the next day with Arianna Huffington as the speaker.

I decided to take a nicely re-skinned folding Sonar SX-70 with me and some PX70 Color Protection Film from The Impossible Project. The camera was having some issues with the rollers and the Sonar is out of wack. I did manage to fix the rollers a bit by pressing the apart with my finger so the Polaroids were no longer getting stuck, but I had to use the camera in manual mode the whole time due to the Sonar issue. Nevertheless I was able to take some amazing photos with it.  Below is my said camera which I managed to re-skin myself!

Sonar SX-70 Polaroid CameraThough it is the end of May the temperature was still pretty cool that all of the pictures were able to develop without me having to do anything extra.  I just avoided the Polaroids having direct sunlight on them when they were ejected from the camera.  Hope you enjoy!

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The Button Polaroid Land Camera Review

The Button Polaroid

The Button

The super cute SX-70 The Button camera was I believe first manufactured in 1981 for about the cost of $30. It has an off white colored body and a light grey face plate with the words The Button in cute white typeface lettering on the right front part of the camera below the lens.  it’s main features are that it has a light meter knob and a socket on the top to take flash bars.  This camera can sometimes be found in stock in my Etsy Shop or you can also find them on Ebay.com and in thrift shops. Since it is somewhat “newer” than a lot of other Polaroid Cameras it tends to be in good shape. The main problem that I tend to see when I get these types of cameras is that the socket for the flash bars no longer works or the light meter sensor no longer works. It is most disappointing to find that the light meter no longer works. All of your Polaroids usually come out overexposed, but you generally don’t find out this is the problem until about 3 photos later which have basically all been wasted. I will put a post up on that later that shows how you can tell with using just an empty cartridge that still has battery life and a flashlight.

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