Review – Canon A1 Sure Shot Camera

 

Canon A1 Sureshot Camera

I have taken this camera on a few trips which have included Cape Code in the Fall and when I went to NYC at the end of this winter / early spring. This camera takes 35mm film and I used regular 100 speed Lomography film on the first trip and I used older expired 200 speed film on the second trip.

Canon Sure Shot A1 Waterproof Camera

The white and creamy orange  A1 was first made in the 1994 an was marketed as the world’s smallest and lightest land-based and underwater camera at that time. It is fully automatic, the camera can be used on land where the 3-point Smart Autofocus is effective for distances as close as 1.5 ft. Underwater, focusing is good from 3.3 to 9.8 ft. In the macro mode, you can focus from 1.5 m to 1 3.3 ft. The large Albada viewfinder on the camera has a long eye relief, making it easy to view even with a underwater face mask or ski goggles. The camera comes with a switch on the bottom for normal and panorama modes you can switch between at any time. The 32mm f/3.5 lens has 6 elements in 6 groups.

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CYANOGRAPH SX-70 Film Review

Cyanograph Film ReviewA few weeks ago I posted that The Impossible Project came out with some experimental film called Cyanograph. It was a monochromatic all blue film and was made for use with SX-70 model cameras. It was relatively cheaper then their normally priced film so I managed to buy a few packs of it.

Below are some of the results of the film using several different cameras, though I believe the best came from a folding SX-70 SLR.  The first few are from non-folding box SX-70 cameras and were mostly taken outside in sunlight.

Cyanograph Film SX-70 Impossible ProjectThis first photo was taken with a non-folding SX-70 camera with an electronic flash. I think that the contrast between the sheets and Mark came out really well and it’s one of the best lit photos that I was able to take.

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The Impossible Project Film and the Bitter Cold

Impossible Project Film

This is a follow up to my The Impossible Project Film in the heat of summer post. Their film is very temperamental and if it’s not developed in the right conditions the colors may be a little off. The main things that affect the development process is temperature and light. I am going to give my insight into developing pictures in cold weather today.

I live in Boston, and to say the least it has been a very long, snowy and cold winter. Taking pictures in this weather is not easy considering I generally walk about town with camera and film in tow making it susceptible to the outside weather. I decided to take out two different cameras out one day during a light snow fall, but it was about 15 degrees F outside. I took with me a more modern 600 series camera with built in flash from the 90’s and a folding SLR SX-70 Sonar OneStep. Both films for the cameras were taken out of the fridge and set out to reach room temperature for about an hour. So after the hour I load the film into the camera and I am out the door.

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Experimental CYANOGRAPH Film for SX-70 Cameras

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The Impossible Project just launched some new experimental film for SX-70 cameras called Cyanograph. It is described as “experimental monochromatic, low-contrast all blue film”. The film just went on sale today, but I would expect for it to be sold out in the next few days. This was offered to Impossible Pioneers first and now it is being offered to the general public.

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The Impossible Project Wish List

The Impossible Project Wish List

 

Review – Polaroid Impulse 600 Camera

Polaroid Impulse Camera

Polaroid Impulse 600

The Impulse camera is non-folding 600 camera that is similar to the SX-70 non-folding cameras. I am not sure when these cameras were first produced, but I have a strong feeling that it was in the late 80’s. There are many versions of this camera, but they generally only varied in color and not much in functionality. This review is for the most common blue grey colored version. It comes with a built-in pop up flash that you push on to reveal the lens. You push it again and the lens cover slides back over and keeps the lens protected. When the cover is over the lens it also causes the camera to kind of shut down and you are not able to take photos. It’s shutter button is located on top towards the back of the camera. Some versions of the camera have a close-up option that is also located on the top of the camera and you have to slide a button and keep it there if you think your subject is within 2-4 feet.  The camera is made out of plastic with a vinyl sort of covering over where you would hold the camera on the sides. The light management system is located in front of the camera right below the lens. It can be moved from the left side (lighter) to the right side (darker).  This camera can sometimes be found in stock in my Etsy Shop or you can also find them on Ebay.com and in thrift shops. Since it is somewhat “newer” than a lot of other Polaroid Cameras it tends to be in good shape.

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Vivitar Point N’ Shoot 110 Camera Review

Vivitar 110 Point N' Shoot Camera Avon’s Vivitar Point N’ Shoot 110 Camera

Vivitar actually made two versions of this camera, and this review is on the more stylish purple version that was sold through Avon. It was manufactured in 1987 and was sold exclusively through the giant catalog makeup company. The camera was completely purple with a minty green shutter button and writing.  It came complete with a matching purple wrist strap and zip up case. The camera has a fixed focus as well as exposure, so it is literally a point and shoot camera. You really can’t adjust anything on it except to add a flash bar when you need some light. I bought this camera off of Ebay for pretty cheap, and it can still be easily found in both the purple and black versions.

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Cape Cod Through a Polaroid Spectra 2 Camera

Taken with Spectra 2 in Cape CodA few weekends I was treated to a weekend out in Cape Cod. It was a good experience, and being about an hour or so drive from my home I still rarely ever go, and have never been during the fall. I took a Spectra 2 Polaroid camera I had just received in the mail and had yet to test. I decided that I had to take it with me to see the results it would give.

 il_fullxfull.458908273_7lazJust to let you know it was not warm when I went. It was generally between 40 and 60 degrees F the entire weekend. This temperature is pretty ideal for Polaroid film and most of my images had no problem developing, although with a somewhat blue hue due to the colder temperature. I also made sure to shield the pictures from direct sunlight right when they were ejected from the camera and kept them in a book until they fully developed.

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Minolta Weathermatic-A 110 Pocket Camera

Minolta WeathermaticEarlier in the year I took a trip to Puerto Rico for a friends birthday. In my mind I though this is perfect for me to take my new(old) little waterproof Minolta camera. It takes 110 film, so it was also the perfect opportunity for me to use Lomography’s new 110 Color Tiger Film.

Minolta Weathermatic-A

The bright yellow Weathermatic-A was first made in the 1980’s as a watertight camera with a built in electric flash that could be used in water in depths of up to 15 feet or 5 meters. It has very large black control knobs on the top of the camera, perfect if you may be diving with it and need easier control. One knob is used for continuous focus for a range of about 3 feet up to infinity. These are designated with the figure of a person from the chest up for close range all the way to a figure of a mountain for landscape shots. The other knob designates the exposure with 3 options of sunny, cloudy and flash needed. The bottom of the camera has a black film advance lever that you cock after every picture taken.  The camera only needs one AA battery to control all of the features.

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Kickstarter: ONDU Pinhole Cameras

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I generally give Kickstarter a good look through on their app with my iPhone every few weeks. I try to limited my consumption of Kickstarter because I would be broke otherwise with my wanting to fund all sorts of neat projects. Anyways I found a new pinhole camera project that is similar to Kelly Angood’s pop-out DIY camera. This project was created by Elvis Halilović who is an industrial designer and carpenter by trade. He has designed a range of six wooden lens-less pinhole cameras that work with both 35mm and 120 film and take Leica format pictures and panoramic depending on the camera you want.

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