Review – The Original Diana-F Toy Camera

Diana-F Toy Camera

In all honestly I also have a new Lomography Diana Mini and a Diana-F+, which I learned to use first and then I dabbled in using this older baby. The design has essentially stayed the same and you can find solace in it’s simplicity. The camera is purely plastic and does feel very toy like in your hands. Everything is manual and the plastic viewfinder does not do you any favors. You can line up some picture perfect moments and then miss them because you forgot to take off your lens cap ūüôĀ But the lo-fi vibe and vignetting on your photos make your pics seem older and richer at the same time.

The Diana-F Camera

The Diana-F and was introduced after the Original Diana as the model that could take a flash. Simple enough I guess the F stands for flash. The Diana was first manufactured in the early 1960’s by a company called the Great Wall Plastic Factory. They would mainly make the camera as novelty items and giveaways for companies. Hence there are many privately labeled and clone versions out there. The Diana-F takes 120 film and should produce 16 4 x 4 cm images. As mentioned before the camera was made of plastic with a black body and dark minty blue top.¬†

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The Diana F+ and the Diana Instant Back+

Diana Instant Back+

I have had my Diana Instant Back+ for about a year now, and I have to say it is a really neat accessory.  I actually have used my Diana F+  more with the Instant Back than with actual 120 film. The first time that I used it was in Ireland while trekking around the country in our rental car. I was able to get some fantastic shots with the pleasure of having them instantly in your hand. My only problem was that I forgot to buy batteries before the trip and we had to scramble across tiny towns looking for an obscure type of battery.

Anyways I just wanted to post a quick tutorial on the use of the back with your Diana F+ camera. In my¬†experience¬†I received the box with the Instant Back and right away wanted to use it, though there weren’t clear instructions to me on what needed to be done. I’m not sure if I lost the manual or what, I can’t really remember, but your first step if to open up you camera and remove the back as if you were going to put in some film. Inside you will see the 120 spool where you film winds on to, as well as a small bracket at the bottom of the camera that holds the spool and the film in place. You may also have a square frame inside depending on how you were having your film turn out in terms of sizing. You need to take all of these components out of the camera as they are not really needed to take the photos and my cause issues in your shots. Keep all of these items in a safe place, as you will have to put them back if you want to use film again.

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