Review – The Original Diana-F Toy Camera

Diana-F Toy Camera

In all honestly I also have a new Lomography Diana Mini and a Diana-F+, which I learned to use first and then I dabbled in using this older baby. The design has essentially stayed the same and you can find solace in it’s simplicity. The camera is purely plastic and does feel very toy like in your hands. Everything is manual and the plastic viewfinder does not do you any favors. You can line up some picture perfect moments and then miss them because you forgot to take off your lens cap 🙁 But the lo-fi vibe and vignetting on your photos make your pics seem older and richer at the same time.

The Diana-F Camera

The Diana-F and was introduced after the Original Diana as the model that could take a flash. Simple enough I guess the F stands for flash. The Diana was first manufactured in the early 1960’s by a company called the Great Wall Plastic Factory. They would mainly make the camera as novelty items and giveaways for companies. Hence there are many privately labeled and clone versions out there. The Diana-F takes 120 film and should produce 16 4 x 4 cm images. As mentioned before the camera was made of plastic with a black body and dark minty blue top. 

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Review – Yashica-A TLR Camera

Yashica-A Camera

Before using this camera I had never used a TLR camera. I do have one of those that are plastic and your put together yourself, but I am lazy and I have not gotten around to building it yet. :/ So there was a bit of a learning curve trying to use this Yashica. I was constantly turning the wrong knob on the side and advancing the film instead of focusing, so my first roll was not used to it’s full potential. I also found the viewfinder pretty dim at times and struggled to see if I was in focus. I was pleasantly surprised when my film scans came back that the camera does take sharp and bright photos.

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The Canon AF35M and the Cross Processed Film

Canon AF35M Camera

This is not really a review of the Canon AF35M Camera as it is more of a quick look over since I have already reviewed this camera. This is bascially the same exact camera as the Canon Sure Shot which you can read about in more detail at the below link:

The Canon Sure Shot Camera

The Canon AF35M is the European version of the this camera and works the same way and shares the same manual. It was also nicknamed the Autoboy in Japan and was Canon Inc.’c first autofocus 35mm compact camera. This post is mainly to show the body of the camera and the photographs that I was able to take with it.

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A Roll of LomoChrome Turquoise by Lomography

LomoChrome Turquoise 35mm film

I know I’ve been recommending Lomography’s LomoChrome films on some of my reviews, but had yet to post mush proof that I was using it. Yay so finally here are a few snaps that I took with the film. I have reviewed the LomoChrome Purple by Lomography here, and it produced some great interesting results. This is the LomoChrome Turquoise version of the film that was produced about a year later.

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Meath, Ireland – The Holga Version

Meath Irealnd Holga

A few years ago I attended a wedding in Meath County, Ireland. I had never really visited the area before, and while we were there we explored other places in the area such as Slane Castle and Newgrange. I never got to see the inside of Newgrange, because there was such a long list and I wasn’t there early enough 🙁 Obviously the sites were gorgeous and green so I tried to capture it with my little trusty Holga.

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A Bit of Europe in Black and White

Black and White Film in Europe

As in my last post this is another set of photos but from my Honeywell Pentax SP1000 Camera, which I reviewed a few months ago. I just had these pics developed at a local lab in Berkeley. The roll had been sitting in a bowl by my apartment entrance and I had forgotten all about it. Now it has seen the light and I think the results are pretty good minus that the film seems to be very grainy.

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Adventures in Black and White Film

Black and White

Recently I have gotten quite a bit of film developed that was taken in black and white with my Holga and Canon SLR AE-1 Program. It just so happens that black and white builds up on me because it’s more expensive to develop than regular color negative film. Both of these sets of film are from last year in 2014 and were taken in the Boston area and during my cross country trip across the United States.

The majority of these were taken on bright sunny days without the use of a flash. It’s 400 speed film which I think added to the amount of grain that some of the photos had.

These were taken during Earth Day where the Neon Trees had a free concert at the half shell near the Charles River.

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Review – Lomochrome Purple Film by Lomography

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I know it has been awhile since I put up a post on Lomography having a new film coming out called Lomochrome Purple that changed the color hues in the photos, mainly by turning green ones into purple. I finally had the chance to take quite a few photos using the 35mm film in a number of different cameras and I love the results. I think it gives pictures both a romantic and old world vibe.

My photos started back when I was living in Boston and I had a day off with friends that were visiting from out of town. We wound up walking to Fenway Park and hanging out in the Back Bay area of town. I used my Canon AE-1 Program for these shots which gave me amazing results.

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Vivitar Point N’ Shoot 110 Camera Review

Vivitar 110 Point N' Shoot Camera Avon’s Vivitar Point N’ Shoot 110 Camera

Vivitar actually made two versions of this camera, and this review is on the more stylish purple version that was sold through Avon. It was manufactured in 1987 and was sold exclusively through the giant catalog makeup company. The camera was completely purple with a minty green shutter button and writing.  It came complete with a matching purple wrist strap and zip up case. The camera has a fixed focus as well as exposure, so it is literally a point and shoot camera. You really can’t adjust anything on it except to add a flash bar when you need some light. I bought this camera off of Ebay for pretty cheap, and it can still be easily found in both the purple and black versions.

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Minolta Weathermatic-A 110 Pocket Camera

Minolta WeathermaticEarlier in the year I took a trip to Puerto Rico for a friends birthday. In my mind I though this is perfect for me to take my new(old) little waterproof Minolta camera. It takes 110 film, so it was also the perfect opportunity for me to use Lomography’s new 110 Color Tiger Film.

Minolta Weathermatic-A

The bright yellow Weathermatic-A was first made in the 1980’s as a watertight camera with a built in electric flash that could be used in water in depths of up to 15 feet or 5 meters. It has very large black control knobs on the top of the camera, perfect if you may be diving with it and need easier control. One knob is used for continuous focus for a range of about 3 feet up to infinity. These are designated with the figure of a person from the chest up for close range all the way to a figure of a mountain for landscape shots. The other knob designates the exposure with 3 options of sunny, cloudy and flash needed. The bottom of the camera has a black film advance lever that you cock after every picture taken.  The camera only needs one AA battery to control all of the features.

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